Perceptions of Prosecutors’ and Judges’ Wheelings and Dealings

News | Rule of Law | Good Governance | Publications | Blog Post 22 April 2019

Rustavi 2 TV channel broadcasted an investigative documentary Studio Monitor and Radio Liberty produced. The documentary “Judges in the Government’s Service” followed up on the government’s attemptedconfiscation of Constanta Bank from its founders in 2011. It further hinted at alleged misconduct by the prosecutors and judges.

 

CRRC-Georgia conducted a follow-up phone survey to find out whether and how the public viewed the documentary. The survey asked about a number of issues presented in the documentary including:

 

- If people knew that the Department to Investigate Offenses Committed in the Course of Legal Proceedings existed in the Prosecutor’s Office of Georgia; This Department was established to deal with problematic issues that the documentary is focused about;

 

- Generally, in their opinion, how likely it was that the Prosecutor’s Office effectively prosecuted representatives of the justice system (judges, prosecutors) if it found they had committed offences in the course of legal proceedings;

 

- How frequent or rare cases of judges in Georgia making deals with the government to have decisions favorable for them are;

 

- If they could recall a specific, recent case of government representatives seizing property from private individuals.

 

They survey is part of the Promoting Prosecutorial Independence through Monitoring and Engagement (PrIME) project implemented by the Institute for Development of freedom of Information (IDFI) in partnership with CRRC Georgia and Studio Monitor with the financial support of the European Union (EU). The contents of this blogpost are the sole responsibility of CRRC Georgia and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Union, IDFI and Studio Monitor.

  

/public/upload/IDFI_2019/PrIME/IDFI_Phone_survey blog_Studio Monitori 2_18Apr2019_survey2_eng.pdf

 

 

They survey is part of the Promoting Prosecutorial Independence through Monitoring and Engagement (PrIME) project implemented by the Institute for Development of freedom of Information (IDFI) in partnership with CRRC Georgia and Studio Monitor with the financial support of the European Union (EU). The contents of this blogpost are the sole responsibility of CRRC Georgia and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Union, IDFI and Studio Monitor.
They survey is part of the Promoting Prosecutorial Independence through Monitoring and Engagement (PrIME) project implemented by the Institute for Development of freedom of Information (IDFI) in partnership with CRRC Georgia and Studio Monitor with the financial support of the European Union (EU). The contents of this blogpost are the sole responsibility of CRRC Georgia and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Union, IDFI and Studio Monitor.

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